Perverted Missionary Workers On Native American Reservations

… the missionary have sexually molested some of the children here…

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For the past five years, 46-year-old singer, songwriter and activist  Davidica Little Spotted Horse has been mounting a challenge to an issue as longstanding as it is controversial: missionaries proselytizing on Native American reservations.  

“Everything got worse after the Diane Sawyer report,” she recalls of the ABC News broadcaster who reported from Pine Ridge in a 2011 episode of the show 20/20 titled “Hidden America: Children of the Plains.” Locals were infuriated by the show’s implicit message suggesting Native parents were failing their children. Soon after, a surge of Christian missionaries descended on the reservation preaching the gospel and handing out diapers.

Little Spotted Horse estimates 15 churches have sprouted up across the 3,500-square-mile South Dakota reservation since then, bringing about 2,500 people each summer — a number she says was far higher when she started her activism in 2015. (Tribal authorities didn’t respond to OZY’s requests for details about missionaries on the reservation.) The streets of Pine Ridge’s largest settlement are dominated by churches and religious centers, while its only café is Christian-themed.

Taos Pueblo and River-500
Taos Pueblo Indian Reservation 

Born in Pine Ridge, Little Spotted Horse lived most of her childhood in Colorado before returning home at age 17. As a young adult, she found herself a homemaker, an emergency medical technician and, more recently, a foster parent. Little Spotted Horse adopted a friend’s infant in 2015, but the friend (who was facing personal struggles) soon returned with missionaries from a local Christian center looking to take the child back. “[The missionaries] convinced the child’s mother that I was a bad parent,” she says. The child was returned to the birth mother and later adopted by a Christian family living off-reservation. Little Spotted Horse doesn’t know who is currently in custody of the child.

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The experience prompted Little Spotted Horse to go into the community and ask if anyone had experienced something similar. What she heard shocked her. Around 130 people relayed to her accusations of sexual, spiritual, physical and verbal abuse, and of missionaries picking up children without the permission of their parents. In one of the most serious cases, a member of a mission based in the Oglala settlement was fired in 2012 after being publicly accused of sexual abuse of a minor. (There are no records of tribal police charges in this case. The mission did not respond to requests for comment.)

Every month, Little Spotted Horse took to the radio airwaves to relay other people’s experiences with missionaries, and she began handing out flyers.

She’s also trying to find out whether missionaries are attempting to baptize children without their parents’ permission. “I don’t have anything against anyone’s beliefs,” she says. “But when you start conversion tactics, that’s wrong.”

Lakota Baptist
Lakota Baptist Church

Little Spotted Horse succeeded in getting a tribal law passed requiring all non-Native missionaries and nonprofits working with Native children to report to the tribal authorities and to adhere to background checks and drug testing.

Natalie Hand, a reporter from Pine Ridge Reservation who’s known Little Spotted Horse for around 25 years, says she is a frequent presence at community meetings. “In our community, she’s raised a lot of awareness,” Hand says.

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Native American reservations are home to some of the poorest communities in the Western Hemisphere. The per capita income in Oglala Lakota County is below $10,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Drug and alcohol abuse are rampant on many reservations, meaning children are especially vulnerable to outside influences. Add to that the painful, multi-generational legacy of forced conversion and abuse in Christian-run residential schools, open until the 1970s, that sought to “civilize” and “Christianize” indigenous communities throughout North America.

Today, Little Spotted Horse laments how missionaries use videos and photos of Native children to front fundraising campaigns, a tactic some locals call “poverty porn.” Some missions charge volunteers in the range of $575 per week.

Deborah Miranda, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a member of the Ohlone Costanoan Esselen Nation, says the war and threats of old are gone, but now missionaries often take advantage of the wounds left behind. “Many reservations are traumatized communities inordinately vulnerable to the ‘kindnesses’ of missionization simply because people are exhausted by poverty and despair,” she says, noting there are “no easy answers.”  

This winter, Little Spotted Horse has embarked on a needs-test project that will take her to every house on the reservation to, in part, document residents’ stated religious affiliations. Operating alone for greater flexibility, she hopes to make the results public in March. Rather than the missionaries, “we as a people, as a community, as a tribe can provide the resources they need,” she says. But she doesn’t have a direct answer for how the cash-strapped tribal government actually can come through.

Havasupai Indian Reservation Grand Canyon
Havasupai Indian Reservation Grand Canyon

To be sure, charities and missionary groups do frequently bring joy by giving Native children the opportunity to take part in activities such as swimming, camping and hiking. They also distribute winter essentials like heaters and blankets. “There’s really no leaders in families, no male role models. There’s definitely a spiritual need,” says David Grimes, president of the Lakota Native American Outreach, a Christian humanitarian mission. The Texan, who’s been living on Pine Ridge for two years, says he hasn’t faced “much resistance with traditional” Native locals but admits that some missionaries descending seasonally on the reservation come with “a cowboy mentality.”

Such efforts only serve to establish dependency, argues Little Spotted Horse.

“For the most part, people don’t want [missionaries] here. But because of the poverty, I guess people put up with them,” she says. “I think many locals wish we had our own resources so that we didn’t have to do that.”

Originally written by Stephen Starr, OZY Author

 

CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY WORKER RAPES AFRICAN CHILDREN and DOESN’T GET LIFE IN PRISON!

A White Missionary Man 21, who sexually abused neglected children as young as five in Nairobi is sentenced to 40 years in prison.

Missionary Matthew Lane Durham, 21, was convicted on four counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in a foreign place. He was sentenced to 40 years in a federal prison and must also pay more than $15,000 in restitution. Durham sexually abused children as young as five while doing missionary work in Nairobi in 2014.

Matthew Lane Durham

A former missionary from Oklahoma convicted of sexually abusing children at an orphanage in Kenya has been sentenced to 40 years in a federal prison.

U.S. District Judge David L. Russell handed down the sentence on Monday to Matthew Lane Durham, 21, who had faced up to 30 years on each of four counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places. He also ordered Durham to pay restitution of $15,863.  Durham showed no emotion when the sentence was issued.

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In 2014 Durham worked as a missionary in Nairobi, Kenya, with neglected children in an orphanage

‘These were heinous crimes committed on the most vulnerable victims. He was their worst nightmare come true,’ Russell said. Durham asked the court for mercy prior to the judge’s order.

‘All I wanted was to follow God’s plan for me,’ he told the judge.

Prosecutors alleged Durham targeted orphans while volunteering at the Upendo Children’s Home in Nairobi between April and June 2014. Durham had served as a volunteer since 2012 at the orphanage, which specializes in caring for neglected children.

He also molested several other children and forced others to perform sex acts on him, according to court documents.

In the alleged confession, he detailed forcing one young girl to have sex with him several times. ‘Any time I try to read the Bible or pray, this image comes to my head,’ he allegedly wrote.

Durham’s lawyer Stephen Jones, who has previously defended the likes of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, says Mrs Menja forced a false confession from the Durham with ‘pseudo-tribal psychological voodoo’ and accused her of running a cult out of her orphanage.

He told the Oklahoman newspaper that the criminal complaint filed by the U.S. Attorney was ‘shot through with inaccuracies.’

‘The events that occurred in Kenya the last maybe five six days that Matt was there frankly reveal some sort of pseudo-tribal psychological voodoo practiced on him, including confiscating his passport, false imprisonment, keeping food from him one day, delay in allowing him to depart from the country, misleading his parents,’ Mr Jones told the newspaper.

‘I don’t think Hollywood could make up what happened at this so-called orphanage. We’re on the ground in Kenya now. We’re finding out a lot about these people. This place is right on the outskirts of Nairobi. It’s like some cult over there.’

This was Durham’s third mission trip to the orphanage in recent years and Mrs Menja had previously praised his compassion and eagerness to work with the troubled children at the shelter, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal district court in Oklahoma City.

Durham helped raise money for the orphanage in his Oklahoma hometown, including giving a presentation at the Edmonton Rotary Club.

Mrs Menja and her husband – both Kenyan immigrants who live in Oklahoma – founded Upendo Kids International, a Christian charity, that looks after troubled, unwanted and neglected children in a community on the outskirts of Nairobi. Every year, young Christian missionaries from the United States travel to the orphanage to work with the children. 

A 12-member jury convicted Durham in June on seven counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places, but Russell acquitted Durham on three of the charges in January.

 

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During that time, Duhram sexually abused and said he raped children as young as five in a 33-day span

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The letter reads: ‘I took her to the bathroom and forced her to have sex with me. This has happened on more than one occasion.’ This is one of the horrific confessions that Durham allegedly wrote out.

The same jury cleared Durham of accusations that he planned in advance to abuse the children before he left the United States. Defense attorney Stephen Jones has said Durham plans to appeal his convictions.

Orphanage officials and five of the children traveled from Kenya to testify at the trial. The children, who speak Swahili, testified through an interpreter only after Russell cleared the gallery and closed the courtroom to the public and media.

In a sentencing memorandum, federal prosecutors asked Russell to sentence Durham to 120 years in prison — the maximum punishment he faced. Prosecutors also asked that Durham be placed under supervision for the rest of his life in the event he is ever released from prison.

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Excerpts of Durham’s confession were read in court by Assistant U.S. Attorney Don Gifford, including a section pertaining to the alleged assault of a 12-year-old girl

 

‘The defendant’s offenses were undoubtedly serious. He raped or sexually molested by force or threat four children ranging in ages from 5 years to 14 years — some multiple times — in a span of just 33 days,’ prosecutors wrote in the memo.

Prosecutors also said Durham’s actions have had a chilling effect on the lives of dozens of foreign volunteers in Kenya and elsewhere ‘who must now live under the cloud of suspicion, distrust and apprehension when they volunteer their time, talent and resources for the betterment of children in East Africa and beyond.’

‘There is a real perception among Upendo’s local Kenyan community that more pedophiles lurk among the volunteers, especially the young male volunteers,’ prosecutors said.

Evidence produced by prosecutors included handwritten, signed confessions that Durham gave orphanage officials after he was accused of inappropriate behavior.

Jones has argued that the statements were coerced by orphanage officials who isolated Durham, took his passport and created the allegations to obtain $17,000 from the U.S. government for security cameras.

Defense attorney Stephen Jones has described Durham, who was 19 when he was charged in 2014, as ‘an emotionally vulnerable teenager’ who was struggling with ‘sexual identity and development’ while also being a devout Christian.

  • Authors note: How could this MONSTER violate these innocent children who were already suffering in an impoverished country but were SAFE from perverts and receive anything less than the death penalty?! These children will be damaged FOR LIFE all because they trusted a white missionary worker who came in the guise of Christianity!!!! He even raped a 5 year old! This is not the first time Christian missionary workers have traveled from the West to African countries only to engage in homosexual activities, paid child sex and rape, many of these sexual violations are not publicized in the news media or reported to the local authorities.